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Rockford, Illinois
February 13, 1944     The Observer
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February 13, 1944
 

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lews Section  Pose 4 Discrimination Against Colored Can Be Ended Bishop F. J. Haas In Article Says Determination Needed Detroit, Feb. 7.--(NC)--"The way to stamp out job discrimina- tion against Negroes is to stamp it out," declares the Most Rev. Francis J. Haas, Bishop of Grand Rapids, Mich., in an article on . . . ,, "The Unions and Discrimination in the current issue of the UAW- CIO magazine Ammunition Bishop Haas points out that munition plants in which white and Colored workers are laboring side by side have demonstrated the practicability of eliminating racial discrimination in employment, and that these plants represent ad- Forreston STEVE'S BUMP SHOP Expert Body and Fender Work Forreston III. De GRAFF BROS. i FURNITURE and FUNERAL SERVICE Forreston " Illinois Amboy LALLEY'S ALLEY'S BOWLING Amboy Illinois vances which recommend them "as working models for the whole in- dustrial structure of the nation." The chief obstacle to ending job discrimination, he observes, is not among union officials but rather among the white workers them- selves, many of whom have not been able to rise above prejudices and who therefore fear the prac- tical experiment that proves how easily this -roblem can be solved. "Let Colored workers have jobs along with whites," Bishop Haas writes, "and be upgraded along with whites in every case where their capacities and skills are equal "to those of whites. This will be a hard saying, I know, to many prejudiced non-Negroes, both unionists and employers, but actu- tually there is no other way of doing the thing if we are really honest about it. "On the other hand, there is one heartening feature about the pro- cedure just suggested. We know from experience that when Negroes and non-Negroes work together they do get along together. They do work together. More than that, they get to respect one another and even to like one another." All in all, Bishop Haas continues "white war workers in Detroit and elsewhere have learned by doing. They have found that Negroes are just like themselves, with the same traits of generosity and meanness, the same capacity for friendship and deception, and the same readi-, hess to give and ask for help, as have their white fellow-employers . This is education of a very l important type--the experimental type . . . American industry needs more of this spirit of trying, of 'taking a chance.' It is the Ameri- can spirit in its best sense." In conclusion Bishop Has urges that "to the Christian the Negro has rights as a man simply be- cause he is a man as dear to Christ as himself." "The American unionist," he declares, "who rises to this nobility of soul will come close to un:.rstanding the inner meaning of democracy that all men are created equal, and under- standing it will practice it with a full sense of fellowship to his fel- low employees whether Negro or white." Aquin Students Junior-Senior Prom Held February 4 In a setting of blue clouds and silver stars, forty-one student couples of Aquin High School danced to the strains of Joe Sal- vato's orchestra at the Junior-Se- nior Prom, Friday evening, Feb. 4. Host and hostesses of the affair were the Junior Class officers: Jack Dale, president, and his partner, Rosalie Virgil, secretary; Bud Clark, class vice-president, and Betty Jane Kilbridge, class treas- urer. Guests of the evening were Dr. and Mrs. Karl Rieger, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bennis, Mr. and Mrs. Her-i bert Stimpert, Mr. and Mrs. Roy i Roddewig, Mr. William Bennis, Miss Dorothy George, and Mr. John Ryan. Refreshments were served dur- ing the evening by Aquin alumnae. Presiding at the punch bowl was William Bear, '39. FANNELLIS CONFECTIONERY ICE CREAM -- CANDIES m BEER Amboy, Illinois O. L ALTHAFER. R.PH. Althafer's Drug Store PHONE 232 CRYSTAL K PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS THE HOME OF EVERYTHING IN DRUGDOM I ALEXANDER LUMBER CO. CRYSTAL LAKE & McHENRY, ILL. FUELS end EVERYTHING FOR THE BUILDER Crystal Lake Hardware Raue Hardware Co. PAIHTS AND OILS PLUMBING HEATING Phone 189 i VOGUE CLEANERS & DYERS Chas. Provo, Prop. TeI.,'$6S Crystal Lake I THE OBSERVER Deaths Of Many Religious, Escape Of Others Told Continued from page 1, News Sec. and tv Brothers, some of the bombs fell within the confines of the Papal villa of Castelgandolfo, the summer residence of the Popes. Dispatches sent by the N.C.W.C. News Service correspondent from Vatican City made mention on two different days of scattered bombs falling within Castelgandolfo. In reporting this the second time, the correspondent said the bombs caused one death and numerous in- juries. It was revealed in this connection that some 2,000 refugees have sought shelter at the Papal villa. Some of them are occupying the private apartment used by the Pope when he is in residence there. Others are using the apartments which usually are put at the dis- posal of dignitaries. The bombs which fell on Castel- gandolfp territory damaged the aqueduct and the green-houses, the Vatican City correspondent re- ports. It was the Vatican City corres- pondent, too, who reported that all the means of conveyance avail- able in Vatican City have been pt to the work of hauling food and supplies for the sorely tried civil- ian population of Rome. i THE FIELDHOUSE In The Interest Of Diocesan Sports By A Staff Writer i Last. Week's Scores at 26 all and 43 seconds remain- Jan. 31--St. Mary's (Woodstock) 51; ttunt]ey 13. Feb. 1--Rock Falls 45; Commun- ity 25. .Feb. 4--St. Thomas 43; South Beloit 34. Feb. 4--Marmion 28; Mooseheart 26. Feb. 6--Marmion 50; :Immacu- late Conception (Elmhurst) 25. Feb. 6--St. Thomas 35; Aquin 29. St. Thomas 35; Aquin 29 Striving earnestly to live up to their nick-name and succeeding valiantly until the closing minutes of play, the Bulldogs of Aquin clung tenaciously to the heels of the Rockford Tommies Sunday aft- ernoon in St. Vincent's gym, only to see the Tommies shake them off in the final quarter and gain a 35- 29 decision. Perhaps it was the memory of their easy 47-26 con- quest of the Bulldogs three weeks ago that led the Tommies to think' they were to have easy sailing again Sunday afternoon. But the game wasn't five minutes old be- fore the visitors began to realize that the Bulldogs had sharpened their teeth in the meantime and ! were out to have a feast of Tom- mie meat. Pifer drew first blood of the game as he hit from close in to get Aquin off to a good start in the first minute. Phillips coun- tered after three minutes with a rebound to even it up, and both fives-battled on even terms to end in a 9-9 deadlock at the quarter. Tight defensive play that was marked by numerous fouls on both sides due to the close guarding, found the Tommies taking the lead at half-time by a 20-18 margin. Aquin again evened the score at the start of the second half and played on even terms with their friendly rivals throughout the third period, as they were outscored by a mingle basket 11-9. Cautiousness was the watch-word of both fives during the final quarter, very few shots being taken, as the Tommies edged their hosts by a 5-3 margin to bring the final count to 35-39. Conley, Tommie center, and their scoring ace for the season, again led both teams with 12 points gar- nered on 4 baskets and 4 free throws. Phillips wan next with e markers, while Cremer with 9 points led the Bulldog scoring. In the opener, the Tommie Reserves were also hard pressed to repel the Aquin Lights 29-25. t. Thomas (35) b i" p Phillips, f ............................ 4 1 1 McGrath, f .......................... 1 1 3 Conley, c ............................ 4 4 3 Aahy, g ................................ 3  1 5 Clark, g ................................ 1 0 2 I Kelly, g .............................. 1 0 3 Doherty, g ............................ 0 0 O Totals ................................ 14 7 17 Aquin (29) b f p Trapp, f .............................. 1 0 2 Krogull, f 0 3 2 Pifer, f 2 2 3 Tappe, c ................................ 4 0 3 O'Rourke, g ........................ 0 1 2 Cremer, g ........................... 3 3 2 Totals ............................. ..10 9 14 Score by quarters: St. Thomas ...... 9 10 11 5--35 Aquin ................ 9 8 9 3--29 Officials: Wallace, Cregan. Marmion 28; Moosebeart 26 Pressed more closely than at any time this season, the Marmion Cadets eked out a 28-26 victory over a stubborn Mooseheart five at the City of Childhood last Fri- day night for their 16th win of the season. With the score tied ing, Don Arimond hit the hoop f,'om near mid-court for the deciding tally. Declining to employ Mar- mion's style of the fast break, Mooseheart played a slow, deliber- ate game that saw the Moose attempting only 21 shots from the field, eight of which were good. The Cadets were held to 22 tries from the floor, ten of which were successful. Each team received 12 chances from the foul line, Mooseheart making 10 and Mar- mien only 8. The score was close all the way, being tied five-all at the first quarter, and Marmion holding only one point advantage at the half 10-9. The Cadets forged ahead 22-17 at the end of the third period for the biggest advantage in the game, but the Moose outscored the Cadets 9-6 in the final canto to come within 2 points of a tie, losing out on the l afore-mentioned basket by Arimond { 28-26. Arimond wan high scorer for Coach Ireland's proteges with 4 goals from the field, while Bal- lotti equaled this for Art Adam's boys with 2 field goals and 4: charity throws. Neff Fichtel, high- scoring Marmion forward, was held to 7 points by the Mooseheart guards. In the preliminary game, 1 the Mooseheart Seconds outclassed' the Marmion Reserves 27-17. Box Score: Marmion (28) b f p Ficbtel, f . ......................... 2 3 4 Kleckner, f .......................... I 2 1' Arimond, c .......................... 4 0 3 Olinger, g ...: ........................ 1 2 4 Zibton, g .............................. 1 0 0 Joray, g ................................ 1 1 0 10 8 121 Mooseheart (26) Pickett t f ............................ 2 2 1 Strand, f 1 2 3 Nichols, c ............................ 3 1 2 Ballotti, g ............................ 2 4 3 Sheets, g .............................. 0 0 0 Hatten, g ............................ 0 1 3 8 10 12 Marmion .......... 4 6 12 6--28 Mooseheart ...... 4 5 8 9--26 In other games during the past week, St. Mary's of Woodstock walloped McHenry for the second time by an overwhelming score 51- 13. Rock Falls upset Community 45-25 to avenge an earlier defeat; St. Thomas gained a second win over" South Beloit, 43-34, while unbeaten Marmion chalked up its seventeenth consecutive victory over Immaculate Conception of Elmhurst 50-25. This Week's Games Feb. ll--Winslow at Aquin. Feb. 12--Marmion at Wilming- ton. Feb. 13--Community at St. Thomas. Feb. 13--Des Plaines at Mar- reiGn. Feb. 15--Sterling Township at Community. Feb. 15--Harlem at St. Thomas. Feb. 15--Aquin at Pecatonica. Feb. 15--McHenry at St. Mary's {Woodstock). Sunday, Februery 13, 1944 I Deaths I AURORA Rose Baldeschweiler, 58, 765 Ge,}rse Ave., St. Mary's parish, Feb. 4. DIXON Miss Katherine Elizabeth McDonald, St. Patrick's pnrish, Jan. 31. ELGIN Joseph F. Klinncrt, 74, 402 Liberty St St. Joivph's parish, Feb. 8. Mrs. Katherine Tauchen, 70, St. Lau- rence pariah, Jan. 31. M. Core E. Wilson, 66, So. Elgin, SL Mary's pariah, Feb. 2. FREEPORT George 'r. Cox, 55. St. [ary'a parish, Feb. 2. Alfred J. Franz, 52, 303 Wet Galena Ave., St. Joseph's parish, Feb. 1. FULTON Matthiaa Hansen, 81, Immaculate Con- cepth, n parish, Feb. 1. HARVARD John F. O'Leary, 81, 208 Ayer St., St. Joaeph*a parish, Jan. 30. LENA Walter August Brandli, 45, St. Joseph'e ,arish, Feb. 2. POLO Geu,rge William nurman, 79, St. Mary's pariah,, Feh. 1. Mrs. Mary Devaney. 82, So. Franklin St., St. Mary's parish, Feb. 7. ST. CHARLES John J. C(,ndon, 68. Dunharn road, St. Patrick's parish, Feb. 1. STERLING Juhn Henry Dawson. 78, 1301 Sixth Ave., Sacred Heart parish, Feb. 5. Mrs. H. M. Jacobs, 33, St. Ma,5"s par. ish, Feb. 5. STOCKTON Mrs. Mar)' Donahue. 83, St. .loseph'| home. HI,ly C,'Jss parish, Feb. 4. WALTON Edward Leo Friel, five monihs, St. Mary's parish, Feb. 7. WEST BROOKLYN Mrs. Roy Woods, 54, St. Mary's parish, Feb. ]. "lt is a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead." (Mac. XIII Mariola Club Charts Entertainment Woodstock.--On Sunday evening, Feb. 20, in St. Mary's auditorium the members of the Mariola club will conduct a public entertain- meat. Mrs. Ted Wett and Mrs. Ray Carr are co-chairmen. BUY WAR BONDS \\; Marchesi Bros. AMBOY THEATRE Amboy, III. - STATE THEATRE Freeport, IlL TOWN THEATRE Prophetstown, III. WARREN THEATRE Warren, III. C.RROLL THEATRE Mr. Carroll, III. ROXY THEATRE Lockport, III. GENESEO THEATRE Geneses, III. Sycamore I Monuments MONUMENTS AND MARKERS REASONABLE PRICES AND BEST OF QUALITY A. C. Doane Monument Works Phone 198---172 WALGREEN SYSTEM Florian Drug Store FREEZER FRESH ICE CREAM Our Own Make Guldbeck & Eckstrom General Contractors Dealers In Building Material 1224 E. Lincoln Highway PHONE 744 DeKalb. IlL _ [ DeKalb Gasoline, Oil DEKALB INDEPENDENT OIL CO. Dealer In HIGH GRADE BURNING OILS LUBRICATING OILS -- GREASES Phone 99 4th E. Uncoln Highway M PHARMACY M PHONE71 DE KALB ILL. WM. M. MERCER R. PH. G. H. McGINTY R. PH.